“Every Try Counts” Campaign Takes Off

According to the U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, “cigarette smoking remains the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the U.S.” and is a heavy public health burden.  For that reason, the FDA has started a new smoking cessation education campaign urging adult smokers to quit.  This new campaign comes on the heels of the tobacco industry corrective statements, informing the public that the industry lied about the dangers of tobacco.  While tobacco industry corrective statements are airing on networks and in newspapers, the FDA campaign will go further and be displayed at gas stations, and convenience stores where a high volume of cigarettes are sold.  The campaign called “Every Try Counts” targets smokers ages 25-54 and will run for two years in 35 U.S. markets.  Notices will also appear on billboards, radio, and in digital and print.

Although cigarette smoking among adults has been decreasing, there are still about 36.5 million smokers in the U.S., and about 22 million or 66% of those would like to quit.  Out of the 55% who did try a quit attempt in 2015, only about 7% were successful.  The “Every Try Count” campaign hopes to “celebrate those quit attempts as a positive step toward success.” Smokers who have attempted to quit before are more likely to try again, and the more times they try, the higher the chance of them “quitting for good.”

A new website EveryTryCounts.gov will provide “resources and tools to help with quitting.” A text messaging program will provide tips and encouragement, and trained coaches will be available online or by phone.  The campaign is funded by fees collected by the tobacco industry, not taxpayer dollars.

Click HERE for the FDA press announcement

 

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